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From the Rooftop Blog

Metropolitan Roof's From The Rooftop Blog keeps you up to speed on how to choose and maintain the best roof for your home or business.

 

Ice Dams: Stop Them in Their Tracks

Kathleen Finn

Ice dams are a stealthy enemy of your roof. Look out for this quiet menace that can wreak havoc on your roof and inside your house. An ice dam is created when heat escapes through the roof from the attic and melts the bottom layer of snow that frosts your roof in winter. Heat that collects in the attic warms the roof but only up to the eave line. At this juncture, the melting snow transforms into a stubborn dam that keeps additional water from flowing off your roof.

Why should you care? The constant moisture that the dams lock in affects frame members, roof shingles, soffits and sheathing by leading to rot. If your insulation takes on water, it can become compacted and ineffective. Shingles can loosen, gutters can get torn off and water can back up into the house causing mold and mildew. Ice dams can happen with as little as 1” of snow coupled with sub-freezing temperatures for an extended period.

To prevent ice dams, you need to warm your roof:

  • Beef up the insulation in your attic.
  • Couple that with lots of circulating air in the attic. Good ventilation carries heat and moisture to the outside.
  • Make sure to plug up any air leaks by adding flashing around chimneys, sealing and insulating ducts, and caulking penetrations around electrical cables and vent pipes, with sealant.

Give us a call if you are battling ice dams. We can help you with preventive maintenance.

Sun Tunnels: Good For You!

Kathleen Finn

Sun tunnels and skylights do wonders for your home environment. That’s a given. Opening up dark nooks and exposing otherwise ignored spaces is good design. Yet, did you know that suntunnels and skylights are also good for your health? For us northern latitude dwellers, light is in short supply at this time of year and for the remainder of winter -- and that shortage of sunlight can wreak havoc with your brain chemistry. Too little light throws your biological clock out of order, which reduces levels of serotonin (a mood-regulating brain chemical) and melatonin (a sleep and mood-regulating hormone). This can lead to depression, fatigue and lethargy -- and too much time in front of Netflix.

So, give your brain a break and let in some light. It will do you good! You will reap benefits even on overcast days, since the brain responds to natural light, not just bright sunshine (although that’s a bonus!)

Call us for a consultation on how to best incorporate some ‘sky’ into your home.

Do you need a Roof Window or a Skylight?

Kathleen Finn

Maybe both! The differences are slight between a roof window and a skylight. Both let natural light flood into your living spaces and create a sense of expansiveness. A roof window is usually larger - if you can see the sky with a skylight, you can see sky and land with a roof window. Roof windows also serve as an egress in case of fire or to enter a balcony. Skylights are made for roofs with a slope of at least 15 degrees while roof windows can vary from this stricture.

Let us take a look at your roof and see what will work for you. Email us to set up a free consultation.